(Source: rightwinged)

(Source: satans-advocate)

lmliberty:

On Heels of ‘Heartbleed’ Bug, National Security Council Backs Disclosure of Software Vulnerabilities

Story by the Associated Press; curated by Dave Urbanski WASHINGTON (AP) — Disclosing vulnerabilities in commercial and open source software is in the national interest and shouldn’t be withheld from the public unless there is a clear national security or law enforcement need, President Barack Obama’s National Security Council said Saturday.

"France is not alone. Germany recently banned managers from calling or emailing staff after normal work hours, unless it’s an emergency. “Managers should apply a principle of minimum intervention into workers’ free time and keep the number of people whose spare time is disrupted as low as possible.”"

Originally posted on Worth A Dime Concerts:

BIG RIVER:
I had a chance to visit my Birth Mother and Birth Father’s graves, for the First Time.  Both graves were near the Ohio River; one in Lawrenceburg, Indiana; the other was in Cincinnati, Ohio.  
I had some deep thoughts and questions, as I stood there feeling waves of surreal emotional energies.  I never knew either Birth Parent. I was…

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Doin’ Me

Originally posted on Worth A Dime Concerts:

Life2
DOIN’ ME: How many scattered pieces of Oneself exists within? What will it take to piece them together?   Does THIS Journey ever End?   Does one’s ‘Experienced Dreams and Mazes’ reveal Answers?   Is Awakeness really Awareness?   And, does NEWNESS really hold Promises of Gifts, yet Unrealized?   Is the Misery of NOT KNOWING a GIFT?   Ah, . .  the…

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"

For example, you may have seen an ad for something on YouTube on your phone, looked it up using the Amazon app on your tablet, and eventually bought it on your computer. Unless you were logged into YouTube when you first saw the ad, Google can’t tell if the sale was a result of the ad, and can’t prove to advertisers—who spend half their mobile budgets with Google—that the money was well spent. It also can’t tell if it’s shown you the same ad over and over again to no effect—information it could use to target ads better.

This is a problem the entire online ad industry faces. But few have as much to lose as Google does, or the clout to push users around. Most companies would be lucky to get one app on your phone’s home screen. Google has a whole mobile operating system, Android. And even people who use Apple rather than Android devices can use a lot of Google apps on them—Google Earth, Drive, Hangouts, Translate, Blogger or even, yes, Google (which exists only to serve as the company’s data gathering tool). Hence its move to unify sign-in across them.

This change affects only Apple users who have upgraded to iOS 7, the latest version—but that’s 85% of iOS devices. They no longer have the ability to remain anonymous as they watch videos on YouTube or navigate their cities using Google Maps.

"

infoneer-pulse:

The Federal Communications Commission approved measures on Monday that will free up more airwaves for Wi-Fi and wireless broadband. The agency also moved to help curb increasing cable rates for consumers, but in doing so cracked down hard on the ability of broadcast stations to negotiate jointly in competition with cable systems.

Perhaps the most significant move by the commission was to allow a broad swath of airwaves to be used for outdoor unlicensed broadband, clearing the way for a new generation of Wi-Fi networks and other uses of freely available airwaves.

» via The New York Times (Subscription may be required for some content)

Do’n Me

Life-isnt-about-finding-yourself

DO’n ME: How many scattered pieces of Oneself exist within? What will it take to piece them together?   Does THIS Journey ever End?   Does one’s ‘Experienced Dreams and Mazes’ reveal Answers?   Is Awakeness really Awareness?   And, does NEWNESS really hold Promises of Gifts, yet Unrealized?   Is the Misery of NOT KNOWING a GIFT?  Ah, . .  the Wonders of Wondering!!!

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BIG RIVER:

I had a chance to visit my Birth Mother and Birth Father’s graves, for the First Time.  Both graves were near the Ohio River; one in Lawrenceburg, Indiana; the other was in Cincinnati, Ohio.   I had some deep thoughts and questions, as I stood there feeling waves of surreal emotional energies.  I never knew either Birth Parent. I was taken from my Birth Mother, when I was a few…

View On WordPress

Yeah Its Really True Records

If you like this website…check out my other website…Yeah Its Really True

thedailydan:

This drone can steal what’s on your phone

This drone can hack your phone

The next threat to your privacy could be hovering over head while you walk down the street.

Hackers have developed a drone that can steal the contents of your smartphone — from your location data to your Amazon (AMZN, Fortune 500) password — and they’ve been testing it out in the skies of London. The research will be presented next week at the Black Hat Asia cybersecurity conference in Singapore.

The technology equipped on the drone, known as Snoopy, looks for mobile devices with Wi-Fi settings turned on.

Snoopy takes advantage of a feature built into all smartphones and tablets: When mobile devices try to connect to the Internet, they look for networks they’ve accessed in the past.

"Their phone will very noisily be shouting out the name of every network its ever connected to," Sensepost security researcher Glenn Wilkinson said. "They’ll be shouting out, ‘Starbucks, are you there?…McDonald’s Free Wi-Fi, are you there?"

That’s when Snoopy can swoop into action (and be its most devious, even more than the cartoon dog): the drone can send back a signal pretending to be networks you’ve connected to in the past. Devices two feet apart could both make connections with the quadcopter, each thinking it is a different, trusted Wi-Fi network. When the phones connect to the drone, Snoopy will intercept everything they send and receive.

"Your phone connects to me and then I can see all of your traffic," Wilkinson said.

That includes the sites you visit, credit card information entered or saved on different sites, location data, usernames and passwords. Each phone has a unique identification number, or MAC address, which the drone uses to tie the traffic to the device.

The names of the networks the phones visit can also be telling.

"I’ve seen somebody looking for ‘Bank X’ corporate Wi-Fi," Wilkinson said. "Now we know that that person works at that bank."

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